David Harewood collapses when his ancestors meet Viscount Russell, who enslaved his family.

Actor David Harewood wept after discovering four times the name of his great-grandparents and having an extraordinary conversation with his ancestor-slave Earl of Harewood.

A 55-year-old hometown star born to Barbados’ parents in Birmingham, a 55-year-old aristocratic Britain built with the benefits of slavery went to Barbados to see the plantation where his relatives worked. I went to the Hairwood House in Yorkshire, my family’s home.

He met Viscount David Russell, 70, the Queen’s goddess and former cousin, the 8th Earl of Harewood. The name of the actor is taken from the name of the house. Slaves with no ancestral records were given the name of their master.

In a scene shot with a channel 5 camera in the documentary 1,000 Years A Slave that aired last night, the aristocrats aren’t guilty of the family’s past, but are “responsible” to permanently empower the family’s name. I explained that I feel that today.

Actor David Harewood shed tears after discovering the name of his great-grandparents four times and having a special conversation with Earl of Harewood, whose ancestors enslaved in a new channel 5 documentary. I’m taking a picture).

The two met for the first time in 2007 at a celebration to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the Abolition of Slavery Act, when David was unaware of the names of his enslaved ancestors. David also visited a house near Leeds in his twenties, but did not know that his family was connected to the house.

However, after meeting with a genealogist in Barbados, he discovered that his paternal great-grandfather Richard Hairwood was born in 1817 on a Fortesque plantation in St. Philip and funded a rural house in England.

Richard’s wife Betty (four times as great as David’s great-grandmother) was also born into slavery on the Fortesque plantation.

David explored some of the family trees, but didn’t know the names of his enslaved ancestors until he met the local genealogist Pat Stafford in San Philip.

Prior to 1854 and the abolition of slavery, enslaved people were not included in the birth and death registrations. That is, David couldn’t find the name in the traditional way.

Born to Barbados' parents in Birmingham, a 54-year-old star (pictured) went to Barbados to see the plantation where his relatives worked and went to the Harewood House in Yorkshire-for profit. From the house slavery of a British family of aristocrats built by gaining.

Born to Barbados' parents in Birmingham, a 54-year-old star (pictured) went to Barbados to see the plantation where his relatives worked and went to the Harewood House in Yorkshire-for profit. From the house slavery of a British family of aristocrats built by gaining.

Born to Barbados’ parents in Birmingham, a 54-year-old star (pictured) went to Barbados to see the plantation where his relatives worked and went to the Harewood House in Yorkshire-for profit. From the house slavery of a British family of aristocrats built by gaining.

However, Pat was able to find the name of David’s relatives by examining the slave records introduced in 1817 following the rebellion of Bussa, the largest slave rebellion in Barbados history.

“I’m looking into my family, it only helps to color my identity and the history of my people. I’m sure it can be a little emotional. In British history It’s a very dark chapter, “explained David, adding that he had never been taught about slavery at school.

David, sitting with Pat overlooking the sugar plantation cluster, explained:

“These plantations were owned by Leo of Hairwood,” Pat explained.

“I found a record of a woman named Betty who had a son named Benjamin.

“I found Richard-17 years old in 1834-these people we believe are four times as great-grandparents as you.”

In tears, David said, “That’s amazing,” adding, “It’s very sad to know.”

David explored some of the family tree, but didn't know the name of his enslaved ancestor until he met the local genealogist Pat Stafford in Saint Philip, Barbados (taken a picture with him).

David explored some of the family tree, but didn't know the name of his enslaved ancestor until he met the local genealogist Pat Stafford in Saint Philip, Barbados (taken a picture with him).

David explored some of the family tree, but didn’t know the name of his enslaved ancestor until he met the local genealogist Pat Stafford in Saint Philip, Barbados (taken a picture with him).

In a more upset scene, the two fathers read the Barbados Slavery Act of 1661. This is part of the colonial law that directs slave owners on how to manage “movables” in torture.This document instructed the plantation master to whip the enslaved people and brand initials. Face with a hot iron.

David Harewood’s Paternal Family Tree

Great great great great grandfather Richard Hairwood, born in 1817 in slavery in the thickets of the Fortesque plantation in St. Philip, later a worker

Great great grandfather Benjamin William, born 1840, St. John, worker

Great-grandfather, Daniel Hairwood, born in St. John, 1867 (worker)

Great-grandfather, Nathaniel Harwood was born in 1867 in St. John

old man, Herbert Hairwood, born in 1900 in St. John

father Romeo Harewood, born in Barbados in 1937

David Harewood- Born in Birmingham, England in 1965

David is one of many British stars exploring the past featured on Channel 5 shows.

Others included Ghanaian actor Hugh Quarshie, Tottenham Rep. David Lammy (descendant of Gaianese and Barbadian), and Lenny Henry, born to Jamaican parents in Dudley.

Returning to England, David went to Hairwood’s house and met Viscount David Russell, the eighth Count of Hairwood.

The Count was the first cousin to be taken away from the Queen and the great-grandson of George V.

He described the palladium mansion, built on the interests of sugar and slavery, as a “white supremacist monument,” and David described the “emotional sacrifice” of the building up to the conference as “wasted.”

“Gorgeousness, grandeur, it’s like a monument to white supremacism. What I can’t see is the other side of the story,” the actor explained.

“I didn’t sleep last night, so I was thinking about this meeting. The feeling of stacking it up to actually meet the 8th Count when it was the 2nd Count who owned the grandparents. I think the sacrifice wasted me a lot, it’s pretty huge.

Talking to the Count, he continued:’My great-grandparents were slaves to your family’s plantations, this is a beautiful house, but it was built on the income of slavery, you are guilty Do you feel or shame?

“No, it’s not a personal method,” replied Count Russells.

“I don’t feel guilty about something you weren’t involved in. I think you have to take responsibility for your actions.

“But in this era, I don’t feel responsible, but I feel responsible. There is nothing I can do to change the past, but I can work now.

“We did a lot in 2007 for the abolition of the slave trade and the subsequent 200th anniversary, and for the programs we have here.

Returning to England, David went to the Hairwood House (pictured) and met David Russells, the 8th Count of Hairwood. This house was built for the benefit of slavery.

Returning to England, David went to the Hairwood House (pictured) and met David Russells, the 8th Count of Hairwood. This house was built for the benefit of slavery.

Returning to England, David went to the Hairwood House (pictured) and met David Russells, the 8th Count of Hairwood. This house was built for the benefit of slavery.

“What I’m trying to do about that heritage is to try it in a small way today to make it a good force.

In a post-parley breakdown, David explained that he was grateful to his daughters Maze (18) and Raven (16) for being able to talk about their ancestors.

“I underestimated the psychological sacrifice of it, and I’m ignorant because it’s obvious to me because I know how much backlash was against Black Lives Matter in the press and social media. It’s tiring to deal with.

“That’s what I’m dealing with and working on, and my daughters can know where they came from and understand where they came from in ways I didn’t know. ..

“It’s a sense of history and story, longevity and understanding of who I am. I now understand who I am. I’m not the only one from Birmingham -I’m more than that.

“It’s proud of me, very proud, I can tell my kids, this is your grandparents, this is what happens to them, they survived, They have to raise their heads, they have to continue the story, it’s a line of strong pride.’

See 1000 Years of Slave on My5

David Harewood collapses when his ancestors meet Viscount Russell, who enslaved his family

Source link David Harewood collapses when his ancestors meet Viscount Russell, who enslaved his family

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